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Courses

The page contains descriptions of classes offered by GIIS.

Fall 2017

ISRL289I: The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions (3) Why are Palestinians and Israelis unable to resolve their conflict? Will they ever? Using insights and methodologies from a variety of disciplines and contrasting interpretations of history, this course will examine why the Palestinian-Israeli conflict continues, why it has become so central in world politics and how it connects with other global issues.

ISRL329E: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Israel and the Arab Spring (3) Also offered as GVPT309L. Credit granted for GVPT309L or ISRL329E. This course will explore and analyze the political, diplomatic, and strategic effects of the Arab Spring and its continuing after effects on the State of Israel, using that as a lense to study the contemporary Middle East. It starts with a preliminary study of Israel's foreign policy and then examines the effects of the Arab Spring on its domestic politics: relations with other regional actors, the Palestinians, and the United States; and Israel's strategy towards non-state actors such as Hamas, Hezbollah, and ISIS.

ISRL329F: Special Topics in Israel Studies; The History of Economic Policy in Palestine/Israel (3) Prerequisite: ECON201. Also offered as ECON398J. Credit granted for ECON389J or ISRL329F. This course examines economic policy in Palestine/Israel from 1999 (under Ottoman rule) through the British Mandate (1922-48) until 1988, when current neo-liberal economic policy began. It will examine how governments and society dealt with issues such as growth versus equality (distributive justice); ideology versus praxis; local original policy versus imported policy; and politics versus academic economics- who decides and under what circumstances?

ISRL349Q: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; The Self and the "Other" in Israeli Culture: Literature, Film, and Television (3) Also offered as CLMT398B, HEBR498Q, and JWST319Q. Credit granted for CLMT398B, HEBR498Q, JWST319Q, or ISRL349Q. Modern Israel includes people of many different faiths, ethnicities, languages, and cultures, but, Jews of European origin have generally dominated its political and cultural climate. Through literature and film, we will explore how the sense of the "self" is constructed and how the "other" is imagined in Israeli culture. "Others" include Palestinians, Sephardim,, Mizrahim, non-Zionists, women, and Eastern Europeans who do not relinquish their ties to the past, as well as other individuals who resist the collective ideologies of a nation constructing itself.

ISRL349Z: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Beyond Black and White: Jews and Representations of Race (3) ALso offered as JWST319M. Credit granted for ISRL349Z or JWST319M. An examination of Western constructions and representations of 'race' from medieval imes to the modern rise of Zionism and the founding of Israel, with a focus on how Jews utilized the racial discourses of each period to negotiate their position within Western history.

ISRL448M: Seminar in Israel Studies; The Israeli War Discourse (3) Recommended (NOT required): Some knowledge of Israel or a previous Israel Studies course. Israel has survived and even flourished since its founding in 1948, despite being engaged in virtually continuous warfare. This online course focuses on the unique cultural and linguistic mechanisms that Israeli society has developed to transofrm war into a "normal" part of life. We will examine the connections between this 'war-normalizing discourse', Israeli culture and society, and foreign policy.

ISRL448T: Seminar in Israel Studies; 1967 and its Aftermath: How they Changed Israel and the Mideast(3) Also offered as JWST429DJ and HIST428X. Credit granted for ISRL448T, JWST429D, or HIST428X. The Six Day/June War of 1967 helped set into motion a series of events that reverberate today. This seminar will examine the results of the war, focusing primarily on the Israeli Occupation of the West Bank, the ensuing radical transformation of Israeli policy towards Palestinians, and its impact on the daily lives of. It willalso examine Palestinian resistance to the Occupation, including the use of terror against civilians.

Summer 2017

ISRL349X: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Conflict Resolution- The Israeli Palestinian Experiment (3)Also offered as GVPT309X. Credit granted for ISRL349X or GVPT309X. This interactive course provides contedning and shared perspectives of the cycles of war and peacebuilding with simulations. Topics include common ground on Jerusalem, Palestinian refugees, Jewish settlements, water, borders, and security. Professor Kaufman has been Director of both the Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace (Hebrew Univeristy of Jerusalem) and the Center for International Development and Conflict Management (UMD). He is concurrently teaching in Israel. Professor Hassassian has been Dean and Vice President of Bethlehem University and is currently Palestinian Ambassador to the United Kingdom. For more information, contact kaufmane@umd.edu. Course preview is available on YouTube and internet: search for 'Israeli Palestinian Team Teaching'.

Spring 2017

ISRL329A: Selected Topics in Israel Studies; Israel's Arab Minority: Past, Present, Future (3) An overview of the Arab minority in Israel, beginning with its roots before 1948 and the events that separated it from Palestinians elsewhere. We will examine Israeli Arabs' clashing identities and their political, social, cultural, and economic circumstances, including their legal status under Israeli law and the tension between them and Israel's self-definition as a "Jewish State". It will also cover recent events and attitudinal changes, as well as their connection with Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, and with the wider Arab world. Sources representing various different points of view will be used.

ISRL329D: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Understanding the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict through Opposing Histories (3) Credit granted for HONR338A or ISRL329D. Not open to studnets who have taken ISRL289I. Israelis and Palestinians have been fighting over the Land of Palestine/Israel for over a century, but both sides date their relationship to the Land back many centuries, even millenia. We will look at the history but especially the "narratives" that the two sides employ to explain and justify, both to themselves and others, their claims to the land, and how these narratives have both molded the shape of the conflict and been molded by it, and changed over time. This is not solely a history course, though it will cover the relevant history. It will focus on the importance of narratives to the continuation of the conflict, as well as elements relating to identity, religion, archaeology, morality, and human rights. No previous knowledge is exoected, but those with such knowledge will find it useful.

ISRL329K: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Jewry of Muscle: Zionism and Jewish Masculinity (3) Also offered as JWST329K. Credit granted for ISRL329K or JWST329K. Part of the Zionist cultural project involved creating a new Jewish masculinity that would replace the diasporic sissy Jew with a strong, healthy new Jewry of Muscle. Using literary and filmic sources, we will analyze how these Zionist and Israeli cultural productions served to build (and sometimes undermine) this new model of Jewish masculinity.

ISRL329L: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Ethnicity in Israel (3) Israeli society is a mosaic of ethnic groups and religions. This mosaic had originally been concieved of as a temporary stage on the road toward a "functioning society", with common interests and vision. Yet, seven decades later after the establishment of the State of Israel, the ethnic rifts ramian evident in innumerable contexts. This course will examine the different groups as well as looking at policy approaches to the issue and how they have changed over time.

ISRL342: History of Modern Israel (3) Also offered as HIST376. Credit granted for ISRL342, HIST376 or JWST342. History of modern Israel since the beginning of the Zionist settlement in 1882. Attention to different interpretations and narratives of ISrael's history, including the historical and ideological roots of Zionism, the stablishment of the State of Israel, ideological forces, wars, and the truimphs and crises of democracy.

ISRL343: Global Migration and the Israeli Case Study (3) Also offered as SOCY398G. Credit granted for ISRL349K, GVPT368G, SOCY398G, SOCY398I, or ISRL343. Over 70% of Israel's population is made of first, second, or third generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomena of modern immigration.

ISRL349M: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Israeli Society through History, Sociology, and Art (3) Also offered as SOCY398I. Credit granted for ISRL349M or SOCY398I. The prolonged conflict with the Palestinians and Arab states and Israeli occupation of the west bank for almost 50 years, had an impact on militarism, political life, centrality of religious-secular relations, gender relations, and the Israeli culture as a whole. We will examine the way art and cinema has dealt with certain cultural issues and what sociology can contribute to our knowledge.

ISRL449B: Advanced Tpoics in Israel Studies; The Israeli Settler Movemnet (3) Also offered as HIST429G. Gredit granted for ISRL449B or HIST429G. This class will explore the Israeli settler movement over the last four decades, from its position on the fringes of Israeli society in the 1970s and 1980s to its rise to prominence in Israeli politics today.

Fall 2016

ISRL249A: Selected Topics in Israel Studies; Zionism, the Yishuv, and Palestine under the Ottomans and the British Mandate, 1881-1948 (3) Also offered as HIST219G. Credit granted for ISRL249A or HIST219G. To understand modern Israel one has to understand Zionism. In the Yishuv period (1881-1948) the Jews developed their future state governing instituions, economy, military, culture, identity and relations with thelocal Arab population. The course's main focus is the history and the development of the Zionist idea since its inception in the 19th century untilthe establishment of Israel in 1948. No previous background required.

ISRL249F: Selected Topics in Israel Studies; Palestinian and Yiddish Literature and Culture in Israel (3) Also offered as JWST289F. Credit granted for JWST289F or ISRL249F. Examines the aspects of Yiddish studies, Arab-Hebrew literature, and Israeli cultural politics in approach to disparate voices in Israeli culture, taking a multicultural approach to Israeli cultural theory. It includes the study of literature, critical articles, films, and television.

ISRL282: Introduction to Israeli Cinema (3) Also offered as FILM298I and JWST219I. Credit granted for ISRL282, FILM298I, HEBR298I, or JWST219I. Students with a strong background in Hebrew are encouraged to also enroll in HEBR499I. An overview of Israeli cinema, with attention to the distinctive themes politics, and problems that distinguish Israeli film-making. Taught in English.

ISRL289I: The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions (3) Why are Palestinians and Israelis unable to resolve their conflict? Will they ever? Using insights and methodologies from a variety of disciplines and contrasting interpretations of history, this course will examine why the Palestinian-Israeli conflict continues, why it has become so central in world politics and how it connects with other global issues.

ISRL349Z: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Beyond Black and White: Jews and Representations of Race (3) Also offered as JWST319M. Credit granted for ISRL349Z or JWST319M. An examination of Western constructions and representations of 'race' from medieval times to the modern rise of Zionism and the founding of Israel, with a focus on how Jews utilized the racial discourses of each period to negotiate their position within Western history.

ISRL349W: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Gender and Migration: Global Trends and the Israeli Case (3) Increased migration, particularly among women, is one of the most discussed aspects of present-day globalization. Yet the discourse about migration both in the media and within academia is still often gender-blind. Through historical and sociological literature this course will critically survey the impact of gender on migration and its relations to ethnicity and race.

ISRL448R: Seminar in Israel Studies; Introduction to Human Rights in Israel(3) Provides an overview of how the State of Israel deals with human rights of its citizens, and also non-citizens over which it has control. It will introduce Israel's legal system, human rights record, and its methods of dealing with human rights violations, including those impacting the Arab minority in Israel, women's rights, and those of the Palestinians in the Occupied Territories.

Spring 2016

ISRL359D: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Understanding the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict through Opposing Histories (3) Also offered as HONR338A. Not open to students who have taken ISRL289I. Israelis and Palestinians have been fighting over the Land of Palestine/Israel for over a century, but both sides date their relationship to the Land back centuries, even millenia. We will look at the history but especially the "narratives" that the two sides employ to explain and justify, both to themselves and others, their claims to the land, and how these narratives have both molded the shape of the conflict and been molded by it, and changed over time. This is not soley a history course, though it will coer the relevant history. It will focus on the importance of narratives to the continuation of the conflict, as well as elements relating to identity, religion, archaeology, morality, and human rights. No previous knowledge is expected, but those with such knowledge will find it useful.

ISRL329K: Selected Topics in Israel Studies; Jewry of Muscle: Zionism and Jewish Masculinity (3) Also offered as JWST319K. Credit granted for JWST319K or ISRL329K. Part of the Zionist cultural project involved creating a new Jewish masculinity that would replace the diasporic sissy Jew with a strong, healthy new Jewry of Muscle. Using literary and filmic sources, we will analyze how these Zionist and Israeli cultural productions served to build (and sometimes undermine) this new model of Jewish masculinity.

ISRL342: History of Modern Israel (3) Also offered as HIST376. Credit granted for ISRL342, HIST376, or JWST342. History of modern Israel since the beginning of the Zionist settlement in 1882. Attention to different interpretations and narratives of Israel's history, including the historical and ideological roots of Zionism, the establishment of the State of Israel, ideological forces, wars, and the triumphs and crises of democracy.

ISRL349M: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Israel: History, Sociology, and Art (3) Also offered as SOCY398I. Credit granted for ISRL349M and SOCY398I. Israel's cultural history through the lenses of sociology, history, and art. In examining the cultural diversity and multiple identities that characterize Israeli society, the course will provide keys to understand the place of immigration waves that shaped its demographic, social, and political structure.

ISRL349Q: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Self and Other in Israeli Culture (3) Also offered as CMLT398B, HERB498Q, and JWST319Q. Credit granted for ISRL349Q, CLMT398B, HERB498Q, or JWST319Q. People representing many different faiths, ethnicites, languagesm and cultures populate Modern Israel. Nevertheless, Jews of European origins have dominated the state's political and cultural climate. Through an exploration of literature and film, we will explore the ways in which the sense of the "self" is constructed and the ways in which the "other" is imagined in Israeli culture. "Others" include Palestinians, Sepharadim, Mizrahim, non-Zionists, Women, Eastern Europeans who do not relinquish their ties to the past, as well as individuals who resist the collective ideologies of a modern nation in the making.

ISRL349W: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Gender and Migration: Global Trends and the Israeli Case (3) Increased migration, particularly among women, is one of the most discussed aspects of present-day globalization. Yet the discourse about migration both in the media and within academia is still often gender-blind. Through historical and sociological literature this course will critically survey the impact of gender on migration and its relations to ethnicity and race.

ISRL448N: Seminar in Israel Studies; Battle of the Narratives (3) Also offered as HIST428W. Credit offered for HIST428W or ISRL448N. The history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and how it is influenced by the narratives of each side. part of the corse will be interactive through distance learning technology with a parallel course at Tel Aviv University taught by one of their professors.

ISRL449N: Advanced Topics in Israel Studies; Puppet Cinema: When Film and Puppetry Meet on Stage (3)

Fall 2015

ISRL 298I: The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions (3) Why are Palestinians and Israelis unable to resolve their conflict? Will they ever? Using insights and methodologies from a variety of disciplines and contrasting interpretations of history, this course will examine why the Palestinian-Israeli conflict continues, why it has become so central in world politics and how it connects with other global issues.

ISRL 329A: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Israel and the Arab Spring (3) An exploration of the Arab Spring and its impact on Israel, discussing the reactions of diverse segments of Israeli society to these events. We will survey regional developments related to the Arab Spring, focus on emerging theoretical approaches in an effort to contextualizing them, and address their broader impact on Israeli approaches to the Middle East. The course will review prevailing attitudes of both Arab governments and societies toward Israel, along with Israeli perceptions of Arab countries.

ISRL 329J: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Representing the Holocaust (3) Also offered as CMLT398J, ENGL332, and JWST346. Credit only granted for CMLT398J, ENGL379J, JWST419J, ENGL332, JWST346, or ISRL329J. Drawing upon a wide range of texts and genres, this course presents a variety of different perspectives on how the Holocaust has been represented. With an emphasis on modern Israeli literature, we will consider first, second, and third generation responses to the Holocaust within a variety of different languages and nationalist contexts. Our investigation will emphasize the international and comparative nature of Holocaust literary studies and facilitate an investigation into the propriety of literary representation.

ISRL 349J: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Politics of Nation Building (3) Also offered as SOCY398Q. Credit granted for ISRL349J or SOCY398Q. Since Israel was established in 1948, the education system has played a major role in developing the Israeli identity. We will examine dominant discourses and debates pertaining to Israeli cultural identity, such as the centrality of the Holocaust, security issues, minorities, religious education, role of literature in national narrative, the role of politics in citizenship education and contemporary debates over History education.

ISRL 349K: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Theories of Immigration: Israel as a Case Study (3) Also offered as SOCY398I. Credit will be granted for one of the following ISRL349K or SOCY398I. Over 90% of Israel's Jewish population is made of first, second or thir generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomenaof modern immigration.

ISRL 349Z: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Beyond Black and White: Jews and Representations of Race (3) Also offered as JWST319M. Credit granted for ISRL349Z or JWST319M. An examination of Western constructions and representations of 'race' from medieval times to the modern rise of Zionism and the founding of Israel, with a focus on how Jews utilized the racial discourses of each period to negotiate their position within Western history.

ISRL 449A: Seminar in Israel Studies; Israeli Politics (3) Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of coursework in Israel Studies. Also offered as GVPT399G. Credit will be granted for GVPT399G or ISRL448A. An exploration of the nature of the Israeli political system: including constitutional structure, the multi-party system, the Knesset, electoral behavior, role of the military and media in the public sphere, and with a special emphasis on the role of leadership in Israel's history. Some previous knowledge of Israeli politics desirable

ISRL 448R: Seminar in Israel Studies; Introduction to Human Rights in Israel (3) An overview of the status of human rights in Israel today and how Israel's legal system deals with them. Issues examined include rights of the Arab minority (including the Bedouin), women's rights, and those of Palenstinians in the West Bank, as well as challenges that face human rights NGOs.

ISRL 449K: Advanced Topics in Israel Studies; Critical Issues in Israeli Cinema (3) Also offered as JWST429J, RELS419F, HEBR430 and FILM430. Credit granted for ISRL449K, JWST429J, RELS419F, HEBR430, or FILM430.

Summer 2015

ISRL 349K: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Theories of Immigration: Israel as a Case Study (3) Over 90% of Israel's Jewish population is made of first, second or thir generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomenaof modern immigration.

ISRL 349X: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Conflict Resolution - The Israeli Palestinian Experiment (3) This groundbreaking interactive course provides an in-depth understanding of this conflict using simulations exploring contending historical perspectives and the search for common ground. Topics include Jerusalem, refugees, settlements, water rights, border disputes and security concerns. Professor Manuel Hassassian is the Palestinian Ambassador in the United Kingdom. Professor Edy Kaufman has been the Director of both the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Center for International Development and Conflict Management at UMD and is concurrently teaching at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel.

Spring 2015

ISRL 329A: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Israel and the Arab Spring (3) An exploration of the Arab Spring and its impact on Israel, discussing the reactions of diverse segments of Israeli society to these events. We will survey regional developments related to the Arab Spring, focus on emerging theoretical approaches in an effort to contextualizing them, and address their broader impact on Israeli approaches to the Middle East. The course will review prevailing attitudes of both Arab governments and societies toward Israel, along with Israeli perceptions of Arab countries.

ISRL 329D: Special Topics in Israel Studies; Understanding the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict through Opposing Histories (3) Israelis and Palestinians have been fighting over the Land of Palestine (aka Land of Israel) for over a century, but both sides date their relationship to the Land back many centuries, even millenia. We will look at the history but especially the "narratives" that the two sides employ to explain and justify, both to themselves and others, their claims to the land, and how these narratives have both molded the shape of the conflict and been molded by it, and changed over time. This is not solely a history course, though it will cover the relevant history. It will focus on the importance of narratives to the continuation of the conflict, as well as elements relating to identity, religion, archaeology, morality, and human rights.No previous knowledge is expected, but those with such knowledge will find it useful.

ISRL 349J: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Diversity, Education and Nation-building in Israel (3) Since Israel was established in 1948, the education system has played a major role in developing the Israeli identity. We will examine dominant discourses and debates pertaining to Israeli cultural identity, such as the centrality of the Holocaust, security issues, minorities, religious education, role of literature in national narrative, the role of politics in citizenship education and contemporary debates over History education.

ISRL 349M: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Israel: History, Sociology, and Art (3) Israel's cultural history through the lenses of sociology, history, and art. In examining the cultural diversity and multiple identities that characterize Israeli society, the course will provide keys to understand the place of immigration waves that shaped its demographic, social, and political structure.

ISRL 448A:Seminar in Israel Studies; Israeli Politics (3) An exploration of the nature of the Israeli political system: including constitutional structure, the multi-party system, the Knesset, electoral behavior, role of the military and media in the public sphere, and with a special emphasis on the role of leadership in Israel's history. Some previous knowledge of Israeli politics desirable.

ISRL 448K: Seminar in Israel Studies; Blasting the Boundaries of the Israeli Canon (3) The production of Hebrew literature has long been tied to the forging of a new Jewish national and, ultimately, Israeli identity. Because of the demands put on literature, it has been the site of intense debates about the relationship between form, content, and the national project We will trace this debate from its inception up to the present day, examining literary works, their reception, and their re-evaluations, and will analyze how debates about the inclusion of literary works in the Israeli canon reflect changes within Israeli culture itself.

Fall 2014  

ISRL 249F: Selected Topics in Israel Studies; Alternative Voices in Israeli Media and Popular Culture (3) This course examines aspects of Yiddish studies, Arab-Hebrew literature, and Israeli cultural politics in approach to disparate voices in Israeli culture, taking a multicultural approach to Israeli cultural history. It includes the study of literature, critical articles, films, and television.

ISRL 282: Introduction to Israeli Cinema (3) An overview of Israeli cinema, with attention to the distinctive themes politics, and problems that distinguish Israeli film-making. Taught in English.

ISRL 289I: The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions (3) Why are Palestinians and Israelis unable to resolve their conflict? Will they ever? Using insights and methodologies from a variety of disciplines and contrasting interpretations of history, this course will examine why the Palestinian-Israeli conflict continues, why it has become so central in world politics and how it connects with other global issues.

ISRL 342: History of Modern Israel (3) History of modern Israel since the beginning of the Zionist settlement in 1882. Attention to different interpretations and narratives of Israel's history, including the historical and ideological roots of Zionism, the establishment of the State of Israel, ideological forces, wars, and the triumphs and crises of democracy.

ISRL 349K: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Theories of Immigration: Israel as a Case Study (3) Over 90% of Israel's Jewish population is made of first, second or third generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomena of modern immigration.

ISRL 349W: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Gender and Migration: Global Trends and the Israeli Case (3) Increased migration, particularly among women, is one of the most discussed aspects of present-day globalization. Yet the discourse about migration both in the media and within academia is still often gender-blind. Through historical and sociological literature this course will critically survey the impact of gender on migration and its relations to ethnicity and race.

ISRL 349Y: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Israel and its Neighbors: Heritage, Politics and Archaeology (3) An exploration of the cultural heritage of Ancient Israel and its neighbors and the influence of that heritage on Modern Middle Eastern religious, ethnic, racial and national identities.

ISRL 349Z: Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Beyond Black and White: Jews and Representations of Race (3) An examination of Western constructions and representations of 'race' from medieval times to the modern rise of Zionism and the founding of Israel, with a focus on how Jews utilized the racial discourses of each period to negotiate their position within Western history.

ISRL 448J: Seminar in Israel Studies; Law, National Security, and Terror: Israeli Perspectives (3) Since its establishment in 1948, Israel has gained considerable experience in dealing with the complex relationship between law and the fight against terrorism. This seminar will present Israeli perspectives on dilemmas that the Western world as a whole is concerned with, arising from the need to find a balance between national security, democracy, and human rights.

ISRL 448N: Seminar in Israel Studies; Battle of the Narratives (3) The history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and how it is influenced by the narratives of each side. Part of the course will be interactive through distance learning technology with a parallel course at Tel Aviv University taught by a professor there.

Lower Level

ISRL 142 Introduction to Modern Israel (3) An introduction to the history, politics, culture and society of modern Israel.

ISRL 249 Selected Topics in Israel Studies (3) Topics in the study of Zionism and contemporary Israel from the 1880's to the present. Future offerings may address history, politics, or culture.

ISRL 269 Special Topics in Study Abroad II (1-6) Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

ISRL 282 Introduction to Israeli Cinema (3) An overview of Israeli cinema, with attention to the distinctive themes, politics, and problems that distinguish Israeli film-making. Taught in English.

ISRL 289 New Explorations in Israel Studies (3) Investigation of critical and innovative responses in Israel Studies. Although the topic will vary, the course will encourage intellectual exploration by students of fundamental problems and critical methods.

ISRL299 (1-3) This lower-level independent study allows students to work closely with an Israel Studies faculty member of their choice, pending prior approval of the faculty member.  In this independent study, students will focus on a topic specific to Israel Studies.

Upper Level

ISRL 342 History of Zionism and the State of Israel (3) Also offered as HIST376. Ideological and political factors leading to the establishment of a secular Jewish state in 1948; Zionist thought of Herzi, Ahad Ha-am, the socialist and religious Zionists, and the revisionists; diplomatic activities; Arab-Israel conflict; post-1948 Israeli society.

ISRL 349 Investigating Topics in Israel Studies (3-6) Topics in the study of Zionism and contemporary Israel from the 1880's to the present at an intermediate level.

ISRL 349X/GVPT 399G Investigating Topics in Israel Studies: Conflict Resolution the Israeli Palestinian Experiment

ISRL 369 Special Topics in Study Abroad (1-6) Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

ISRL 448 Seminar in Israel Studies (3) Intensive study of an Israel Studies topic. Expected work product is a substantial research or analysis paper or appropriate equivalent.

ISRL 449 Advanced Topics in Israel Studies (3) Topics in the study of Zionism and contemporary Israel from the 1880s to the present at the advanced level. Individual sections may address history, politics, or culture. Some Sections may have language or course prerequisites.

ISRL499 (3) This upper-level independent study allows students to work closely with an Israel Studies faculty member of their choice, pending prior approval of the faculty member. In this independent study, students will focus on a topic specific to Israel Studies.

ISRL699 (1-3) Independent study for graduate students on topics in Israel Studies

 

 

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2011, The Joseph and Alma Gildenhorn Institute for Israel Studies